On this day…

… in 1893 (which was also a Saturday!) James Stevens wrote in his Diary…

Midsummer Day. The weather is now rough and cold wind with showers. Grass never remembered to be so much dried up at the time of the year.

Even the weather sounds familiar!

Then in 1902 James wrote…

Pulled the 300 faggots of furze on top of Beacon to make bonfire on the 26th, Mr. CLemens and his mare helped, for the King’s Coronation (Edward VII). But the King has this day had to go under an operation there being an absess or napsies in his abdomen, so his Coronation is postponed. (Tuesday 24th June)

Sir Frederick Treves (also well known as the friend of Joseph Merrick ‘The Elephant Man’) carried out the operation to drain the King’s abdominal cyst on a table in the Music Room at Buckingham Palace.  Originally scheduled for 26th June, the Coronation finally took place on Saturday 9th August, reported on that day by James as…

Coronation of King Edward VII. At tea in schoolroom, sports and cricket held in field.

On this day in 1897…

… James Stevens wrote in his Diary…

Zennor had its jubilee treats today [Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee].  The children under 15 and the people over 60 had a free tea and others paid 9d each, the children had medals.  I and Honor went to Churchtown in evening and saw the sports, jumping, running etc.  James [James & Honor’s son] was champion runner in two races.  Tom Berryman champion in the foot steeple chase but fell over the last hedge and dislocated his hand wrist.  A bonfire of 100 faggots of furze was burnt on the top on Tremeddar Carne or in Churchtown Downs, rockets were also sent up by the coastguards, and a flag was flying on the tower today, yesterday and last Sunday when special services and hymns were used in Church as thanksgiving for the Queen’s long glorious reign.  Towednack Brass Band was in attendance today. (Wednesday 23rd June 1897)

On this day …

… in 1897 James Stevens wrote in his Diary…

At or on Trendrine Hill at ten o’clock p.m. and saw about 25 bonfires lighting and fireworks going up to celebrate Queen Victoria’s long reign of 60 years called the Diamond Jubilee. James and Bessie saw them too. (Tuesday 22nd June 1897)

And in 1893 James wrote…

H.M.S. Warship Victoria sunk off Italy drowning 430 men out of a crew of 700. She was struck by another ship in naval manoeuvres and sank in six minutes. Admiral Sir. George Tryon got drowned, one of England’s greatest seamen. (Thursday 22nd June 1893)

According to Wikipedia Vice-Admiral Sir George Tryon KCB (born 1832) died when his flagship HMS Victoria collided with HMS Camperdown during manoeuvres off Tripoli.  His last words as he went down with his ship were reported to have been “It is all my fault”.

 

Cornish photo archive…

… at the Morrab Library, Penzance

If you’re doing Cornish family or local history research, a good place to look for ‘lost’ photos is the Morrab Library Photographic Archive.  They have an archive of 15,000 glass and celluloid negatives, and black and white prints, plus an online catalogue.  They are currently scanning images to add to their catalogue entries, so you might be lucky enough to find some of the photos you’re looking for already scanned (I was!)

Their website is http://photoarchive.morrablibrary.org.uk/

James Stevens 1847-1918 and Honor Stevens 1851-1922 (nee Stevens!)

 

 

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On Friday 8th November 1912 James Stevens wrote in his Diary… 

 At Penzance and Honor, we had our photos taken at Prestons.

So this is possibly that photo, making James 65 years old and Honor 61.

Honor’s maiden name was Stevens, so it was a case of ‘Stevens marrying Stevens’. 

 

 

 

On this day in 1911 …

… James Stevens wrote in his Diary …

James and Ernest [Thomas] with horses and wain carrying 300 faggots of furze (which James cut) to the beacon for a bonfire tonight, there is also stumps of trees tar and paraffin. The weather is rainy with hard wind. At a Memorial Coronation Service in Church of King George V and at a tea in schoolroom and sports in field. The children of the parish under 16 had a mug and a tea and those over 65 a free tea and others at 6d each and a bonfire in the evening on beacon. (Thursday 22nd June 1911)